WELCOME TO AN UNOFFICIAL HOMEPAGE IN SUPPORT OF THE U.S. MARINE CORPS WOUNDED WARRIOR CENTER, CAMP PENDLETON, CA.

WELCOME TO AN UNOFFICIAL HOMEPAGE IN SUPPORT OF THE U.S. MARINE CORPS WOUNDED WARRIOR CENTER, CAMP PENDLETON, CA.

HELP THOSE WHO HAVE TAKEN BULLETS FOR YOU!!!!!

THE U.S. MARINE CORPS WOUNDED WARRIOR CENTER, CAMP PENDLETON, CA. IS A 26-BED CENTER WHICH OPENED IN AUGUST, 2006, AND IS GEARED TO SERVICE MEMBERS IN LONG-TERM REHABILITATION WHO ARE OUT OF THE HOSPITAL BUT NOT WELL ENOUGH TO RETURN TO THEIR UNITS. TWO NEWSPAPER REPORTS ON THE CENTER ARE AVAILABLE AT http://tinyurl.com/zypzh AND http://tinyurl.com/qkef4. PLEASE BECOME FAMILIAR WITH THIS WONDERFUL FACILITY, CALL THEM AT 760-725-9805 AND LET THEM KNOW WHAT YOU CAN DO TO HELP OUT!!! IF YOU HAVE NOT TAKEN A BULLET FROM OSAMA, THAT IS AN ORDER!!!

THE MAILING ADDRESS FOR THE CENTER IS:

WOUNDED WARRIOR CENTER

P.O. BOX 555192

CAMP PENDLETON, CA 92054 

 

PLEASE ALSO CONSIDER MY MEMORIAL PAGE FOR TWO HEROIC B-52 CREW MEMBERS WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES DECEMBER 22, 1972 OVER HANOI HELPING TO END THE VIETNAM WAR!!!:

 HTTP://CAPTJOECOPACKANDMAJBUDDYBENNETT.8K.COM/ 

 

 

 

THE WEBMASTER (OVIOUSLY THE ONE IN THE MIDDLE) DELIVERING ONE HOMEMADE QUILT TO THE CENTER IN HONOR OF THE CORPS' 231ST BIRTHDAY!!!!

CENTER DESIGNED TO HELP INJURED MARINES AND SAILORS!!!!

UNION-TRIBUNE STAFF WRITER August 11, 2006

EDUARDO CONTRERAS / Union-Tribune
Cpl. Jackson Luna says he probably will spend about six months at the new Wounded Warrior Center at Camp Pendleton, recovering from a sniper wound he suffered in June in Iraq. He was one of the first two new residents at the facility.
With the sound of artillery fire in the background, Camp Pendleton officials opened the Wounded Warrior Center yesterday with promises to offer services previously found only on the East Coast.

Based on a similar program at Camp Lejeune, N.C., the center is designed to help Marines and sailors who are too well to be hospitalized but not well enough to return to their units or the civilian world.

Lt. Gen. John F. Sattler, commander of the 1st Marine Expeditionary Force based at Camp Pendleton, described the mission of the one-story, beige building and its staff as “returning freedom for those who fought for ours.”

“This facility says that we care, we give a damn,” Sattler told hundreds of Marines and guests. “All they are looking for is the opportunity (to get better).”

Base commander Col. James B. Seaton III said the center is the medical equivalent of the Corps' “no Marine left behind” edict.

And Maj. Gen. Mike Lehnert reflected on the project's importance to a service member's future.

“The bottom line is that we owe a great deal to these Marines. These people aren't done by any stretch. They are at the beginning. ... What we want to do is put them on the best path,” said Lehnert, commander of Marine Corps Installations West, which consists of Camp Pendleton and six other bases.

It took about a month and a half to get the center into mostly proper shape for the inaugural group of wounded service members. The 26-bed facility still had the smells of new carpet and paint yesterday. Boxes that recently held items for the center were piled in a trash bin, and some unfinished rooms had renderings showing what they would ultimately look like.

Wounded Warrior Center

What: Facility that helps injured Marines and sailors recover so they can continue active-duty service or transition to civilian life.

Where: Camp Pendleton.

Capacity: Can accommodate about two dozen patients.

Features: Ramps for wheelchair users, hand bars along the center's walls and staff members who also have suffered combat injuries.

The wing designated for Marines was decidedly military-lite. Each of its rooms had a TV. On each bed was a quilt, which gave the environment a bed-and-breakfast feel.

About a dozen Marines were scheduled to begin living in the center by week's end.

Cpl. Jackson Luna, 23, was one of the first two residents.

A sniper shot Luna in the back, just below his armored vest, on June 10 in Iraq. The bullet exited an inch below his bellybutton. Luna sat on the foot of his bed yesterday morning, his Purple Heart medal a few feet behind him.

“I feel pretty lucky to recover here,” he said, “to get back on the right track someday.”

Luna expects to recuperate at the center for six months or so. During that time, he aims to work on the base while exploring his options of staying in the Corps or leaving the Marines to pursue further education.

Wounded Marines should be able to remain in the service if they want to, Marine Corps Commandant Gen. Michael Hagee has said in the past. He has pledged to find suitable jobs for them.

As of yesterday, Gunnery Sgt. Mel Greer was the top enlisted man at the center. He was shot twice in the right thigh in October 2004. That was 10 operations and hundreds of pain pills ago, he said.


EDUARDO CONTRERAS / Union-Tribune
Sgt. Timothy Kerrigan, at opening ceremonies yesterday of the Wounded Warrior Center at Camp Pendleton, was injured by a sniper in Iraq while trying to help Cpl. Jackson Luna.
Greer now works at the facility. He believes that only fellow wounded service members could fully understand the hallmarks of rehabilitation: the miasmic haze of medication, the often torturous process of physical and mental recovery, the huge amount of paperwork involved.

“I have been shot. I have been in the hospitals. I have dealt with the bureaucracy. I'm here so they can look at me and say, 'If Gunny can do it, I can do it,' ” Greer said. “The system works, and I am here to help them make it work.”

The Wounded Warrior Center joins a list of programs geared toward aiding injured Marines and sailors. A complementary service is the new Combat Casualty Assistance Program run by the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society at Camp Pendleton.

“These programs are part of a chain of care that did not exist before. When you have a single Marine wounded today, it is not so easy for the family to provide support,” said Mike Hire, director of Combat Casualty Assistance.

“Before (the Vietnam War), we used to have nuclear families where dad worked and mom didn't. We don't have that now. We have families were both parents work or where the family is on the other side of the country.”

 

 

 

September 16, 2006

EDUARDO CONTRERAS / Union-Tribune
Navy Corpsman Aaron Seibert inspected a room at the Wounded Warrior Center for injured service members. The rehabilitation center opened last month.
CAMP PENDLETON – Therese Thomas is calling sewing groups across the country to round up a few more quilts for the beds of injured Marines.

Others are buying coffee makers and dinner plates for wounded service members recovering in the base's new Wounded Warrior Center.

The 26-bed center, which opened last month, is geared to service members in long-term rehabilitation who are out of the hospital but not well enough to return to their units.

“We're trying to make it more like home instead of military barracks,” said George Brown, executive director of the Camp Pendleton Armed Service YMCA.

The center needs household items such as wastebaskets, pictures for the walls, barbecue grills, ceiling fans and steel shelving along with sports equipment, hand tools and some furniture.

“They're not pie in the sky wishes. They're just things to keep morale up,” said Thomas, a retired police officer whose late husband served in the Navy.

Over the last few months, Thomas sewed two quilts, one featuring Marine Corps red patches along with other multi-colored squares.

“Little bits help. I'm just trying to do what I can,” Thomas said.

In a wish list put out by the center, Gunnery Sgt. Mel Greer Jr., who was wounded in 2004 and works at the center, wrote, “Everything is of value to us. Your volunteer time, any items you would like to donate or even a simple visit just to say 'Hi' is greatly appreciated.”

Thomas is trying to get the word out to community groups, schools and individuals who might want to donate items.

“Sometimes the wounded feel like they're left by the wayside and nobody cares. This is a way to show our respect and appreciation,” Thomas said.

Noncash donations for the wish list are coordinated by the Camp Pendleton YMCA.

Cash donations are handled by Injured Marine Semper Fi Fund and checks should reference the Wounded Warriors Center.

Before purchasing something on the wish list, it is advisable to call the Wounded Warrior Center to confirm what they need.

Wounded Warrior Center: (760) 725-9805.

Injured Marine Semper Fi Fund: (760) 390-4930.

Camp Pendleton Armed Service YMCA: (760) 385-4921.

Donation of quilts: theresetax at sbcglobal dot net 

 

 

DRIVING DIRECTIONS TO THE CENTER!!!!!

TAKE THE CAMP PENDLETON EXIT OFF I-5 JUST NORTH OF OCEANSIDE...AT THE GATE, TELL THE MP THAT YOU ARE GOING TO VISIT THE WOUNDED WARRIOR CENTER...HE MAY JUST CHECK YOUR ID OR ASK YOU TO GET A TEMPORARY PASS...PROCEED NORTH ON VANDERGRAFF, THE ROAD YOU ENTERED THE BASE ON AND GO NORTH FOR ABOUT TEN MILES...YOU WILL PASS THE AIRPORT ON YOUR LEFT AND THE FIRE STATION ON YOUR RIGHT...LOOK FOR THE LEFT TURN TO THE BASE HOSPITAL...GO JUST PAST THE HOSPITAL AND YOU WILL SEE A LARGE RED SIGN INDICATING THE CENTER...ENTER THE FACILITY FROM THE PARKING LOT...THANK YOU